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Educational Studies

Credits:
2

This course is the first of a two course sequence to prepare future teachers of English as a foreign language to teach English to non-native speakers of English in cross-cultural settings, either in the US or abroad. 

Credits:
2

This course is the 2nd course of a two course sequence to prepare future teachers of English as a foreign language to teach English to non-native speakers of English in cross-cultural settings, either in the US or abroad. 

Credits:
4
Degree Requirements:
F8

Foundations of Education serves as an introduction to the social, cultural, and philosophical foundations of education in the United
States. It is designed to cover elements of the history, anthropology, philosophy, sociology, and theory of educational practice in this
country, and with the enduring questions, debates, and conflicts that abound regarding teaching, learning, schools, and society.

Credits:
4
Degree Requirements:
F9

Urban Education focuses on the contemporary practices and theories of teaching and learning in densely populated high poverty areas and the particular challenges and opportunities such work presents. Students gain first-hand experiences tutoring and observing in urban K-12 classrooms, apply theory to their work in schools and gain a better understanding of the history and present contexts of race, poverty, and resilience in urban communities and schools.

Prerequisites:
Credits:
4
Degree Requirements:
F9, F11

This course provides a theoretical and empirical overview of the experiences of Blacks in education. The course will begin with a brief synopsis of historical perspectives on the education of African Americans, including key factors responsible for inequalities and oppression within the U.S. education system (e.g., segregation and institutional racism). Next, the course will explore key psychological issues that relate to the academic challenges (teaching and learning processes), motivation and scholastic achievement of African American youth. The course will continue its study with an investigation of the structural factors and social contexts that influence the African American schooling experience as well as examine how these schooling experiences may differ as a function of gender and class. This course will conclude with a critical analysis of evidence based practices and social-psychological interventions for African Americans and the policy/practice implications that they provide for improving educational outcomes for African American youth. Participants in this course will have an opportunity to strengthen understanding of course topics and real world issues through volunteering at a nearby school.

Prerequisites:
Credits:
4

Content may vary from year to year with the instructor. Course may be repeated as long as topics are different. Recent topics have included the Essaying in Education and Social Change and Digital Media.

Prerequisites:
Credits:
4

This course will review empirical research in education and cognitive psychology that has examined the ways in which technology can
be integrated into the 21st century classroom environment. Specifically, we will examine and practice implementing the ways in which
technology can be used to effectively teach and communicate within and beyond the classroom and how technology can be integrated
into assignments that extend beyond the classroom to facilitate student learning and engagement. In doing so, students will gain
experience integrating technology within lesson plans as a means for satisfying student learning outcomes. Finally, students will develop
an understanding of technology-based ethical standards and good citizenship practices that can be communicated to students and peers.

Prerequisites:
Credits:
4
Degree Requirements:
F2i

This course will explore the multiple ways in which reading and writing are practiced in and around urban schools. It begins with an examination of the different ways literacy is defined by researchers, teachers, and students, considering the implications of these definitions for curriculum and instruction.  The course compares and contrasts theories of literacy acquisition and development, with particular attention to how these theories envision the pedagogical relationships between teachers and students. These theoretically-rooted examinations of literacy will guide considerations of how literacy is practiced and learned across content areas within elementary and secondary classrooms. 

Prerequisites:
Credits:
4
Degree Requirements:
F9

Race, Class, Gender, and Sexuality in Education explores and investigates the various ways that race, class, gender, and sexuality interact
and intersect in the context(s) of education. It is designed to cover aspects of each of these social categories from various perspectives in
order to provide for deep and complex interpretations of social phenomena as they manifest in educational settings and how these social
categoreis impact work inside and outside of schools.

Prerequisites:
Credits:
4

This course focuses on the development of the pedagogical knowledge, skills, and dispositions appropriate for successful teaching and
provides opportunities for the student to apply the principles learned in the course. Special attention is given to the Ten Core Principles
developed by the Interstate New Teacher Assessment and Support Consortium (INTASC). The Curriculum and Instruction course is a
service learning course in that each student is required to serve as a tutor in a PK-12 setting.

Prerequisites:
Credits:
1-4
Degree Requirements:
F11

Field experiences are designed to give students guided and controlled experiences with professionals in elementary and secondary schools, and in some cases with community partners. They are also designed to expand and challenge personal and professional attitudes while providing personal and professional growth opportunities for prospective teachers and other professionals in education. Observation and first-hand experience within P-12 settings provide candidates with information and tools that complement classroom study and assist in the development of pedagogical skills, knowledge, and dispositions necessary for effective teaching. Secondary licensure candidates will complete three one-credit field placements; elementary candidates will complete four one-credit placements. All field experiences for licensure candidates will occur in Shelby County Schools (SCS). Licensure students enrolled for one credit will complete a minimum of 60 hours in an assigned SCS classroom. Students in the non-licensure tracks will complete three one-credit field placements; at least one of these must be in a school. Field placements must be requested and approved by the Director of Licensure and Field Placements and finalized in the semester prior to enrollment.  Application deadlines are posted on the Educational Studies website. A minimum grade of B is required for students seeking licensure.  Students who earn lower than a B in this course must repeat the course.

Credits:
4

This course, primarily designed for Educational Studies majors pursuing elementary teacher licensure, will explore, enact, and critically examine different approaches to the teaching and learning of literacy within elementary classrooms (K-5). Through reading and discussion of both theory and empirical research on literacy pedagogy, students will develop their understandings of the varied approaches to the teaching of elementary literacy while considering the historical and political roots of these approaches. The course will involve a weekly tutoring component, in which students will engage in a recursive cycle of planning for, engaging in, and reflecting on literacy activities with an elementary-aged child.

Prerequisites:
Credits:
2 or 4
Degree Requirements:
F11

Students enrolling in the Directed Research course propose a research topic to the Education Program Committee and once approved,
conduct an independent research on the topic. All directed research projects must be supervised by a faculty member. Requirements will vary as to the selected topic and will include: regular meetings with the faculty member, scholarly research, and a final written report or curriculum project. An oral presentation will be made to an appropriate group or class.

Prerequisite; One additional Educational Studies Course

Prerequisites:
Credits:
1 - 4
Degree Requirements:
F11

The Internship in Education is arranged on an individual basis and is designed to meet the identified needs and/or interests of the student. Students will complete their internships in local schools or educational settings and will be supervised by the course instructor and an off-campus supervisor or clinical educator. Only 4 internship credits may count toward the major or minor.  Students will complete a minimum of 40 hours of field experience per credit earned.  All internships must be arranged by the Director of Teacher Licensure and Field Placements in the semester prior to start date.  Application deadlines are posted on the Educational Studies website.  Students will earn grades in this course.

Credits:
4

Senior Seminar is a topic-based advanced seminar for Educational Studies majors and minors in their final semester of coursework. The
course involves students actively learning, teaching, researching, and engaging in independent topics of special interest, in consultation
with the professor, as they relate to educational policy and practice based around a central shared theme. Examples include federal
education policy, culturally relevant pedagogy, multicultural education, and critical pedagogy.

Credits:
12

In order to obtain a teaching license in the state of Tennessee, all teacher licensure candidates at Rhodes are required to complete a semester of student teaching. The state requires that all candidates complete two distinct 8 week placements in one or two Shelby County Schools. Candidates will begin their student teaching on the first day of the SCS calendar year. Twice a month, candidates will meet to discuss their experiences and practices with a Rhodes faculty member. Prior to student teaching, all candidates will be fingerprinted and must pass a criminal background check. Candidates are also expected to attend all orientations hosted by SCS or and Rhodes. Clinical Student Teaching Applications can be found on the program website and must be submitted by the designated deadline. It is highly recommended that candidates meet with the Director of Teacher Licensure and Field Placements prior to submitting the application. A minimum grade of B is required of all licensure candidates. Candidates who earn lower than a B in this course must repeat the course.

Prerequisite: Completion of all teaching licensure coursework

Credits:
4

This course focuses on the ways in which technology can be integrated into the 21st century classroom environment. Specifically, we will examine and practice implementing the ways in which technology can be used to effectively teach and communicate within and beyond the classroom and how technology can be integrated into assignments that extend beyond the classroom to facilitate student learning and engagement. In doing so, teacher candidates will gain experience integrating technology within lesson plans as a means for satisfying student learning outcomes. Finally, candidates will develop an understanding of technology-based ethical standards and good citizenship practices that can be communicated to students and peers.

Credits:
4

Foundations of Urban Education serves as an introduction to the social, cultural, and philosophical foundations of urban education in the United States. It is designed to cover elements of the history, anthropology, philosophy, sociology, and theory of educational practice in this country, and with the enduring questions, debates, and conflicts that abound regarding teaching, learning, schools, and society.

Credits:
4

All teachers are reading teachers. That is, reading and literacy more broadly are essential skills for all academic and intellectual activity. This course takes a broad view of literacy, and aims to equip teacher candidates with a wealth of theories and resources for engaging students in complex analysis across subject matter areas. Special attention is given to applications of critical theories of literacy in urban school contexts.

Credits:
4

Statistical methods are being used more and more frequently in P12 educational settings to better assess and understand educational performance and outcomes. In this course, teacher candidates will work with data they will eventually be assessed on as practicing teachers, including test score data, value-added metrics, and grade level norms.  Emphasis is placed on application of statistical analyses and implications both for policy and practice.

 

Credits:
4

This course explores and investigates the various ways that culture, identity, race, class, gender, and sexuality interact and intersect in the context(s) of urban education. It is designed to cover aspects of each of these social categories from various perspectives in order to provide for deep and complex interpretations of social phenomena as they manifest in educational settings and how these social categories impact work inside and outside of schools.

Credits:
4

This course focuses on the development of the pedagogical knowledge, skills, and dispositions appropriate for successful teaching in urban schools and provides opportunities for teacher candidates to apply the principles learned in the course in practice. Special attention is given to the Ten Core Principles developed by the Interstate New Teacher Assessment and Support Consortium (INTASC).

Credits:
4

Methods-centric field experiences pair teacher candidates with outstanding local urban educators in an intensive practicum experience wherein candidates observe, participate in, and develop their own lessons under the guidance of an exemplary master teacher.  Candidates complete 20 hours of field experiences each week, and meet one on one with their mentor teachers daily to discuss methodological choices and approaches to instruction. All field experiences for licensure candidates will occur in Shelby County Schools (SCS). Field placements must be approved by the Director of Licensure and Field Placements. A minimum grade of B is required in this course. Candidates who earn lower than a B must repeat the course, thus delaying licensure and the conferring of the degree.

Credits:
4

The final capstone course, candidates work with a renowned scholar on subjects selected by the scholar in residence and work to make connections between their own projects, experiences in urban classrooms, and the scholarship of the researcher they are working with.  The course concludes with a presentation of research findings and capstone projects, with comments and recommendations from the scholar in residence.

Credits:
8

In order to obtain a teaching license in the state of Tennessee, all teacher licensure candidates at Rhodes are required to complete a semester of student teaching. The state requires that all candidates complete two distinct 8 week placements in one or two Shelby County Schools. Students will begin their student teaching on the first day of the SCS term in the spring. Twice a month, candidates will meet to discuss their experiences and practices with a Rhodes faculty member. Prior to student teaching, all candidates will be fingerprinted and must pass a criminal background check. Candidates are also expected to attend all orientations hosted by SCS and Rhodes. Clinical Student Teaching Applications can be found on the program website and must be submitted by the designated deadline. It is highly recommended that candidates meet with the Director of Teacher Licensure and Field Placements prior to submitting the application. A minimum grade of B is required in this course. Candidates who earn lower than a B must repeat the course, thus delaying licensure and the conferring of the degree.

 

Prerequisites: Completion of related coursework and EDUC 560.

 

 

Credits:
2

Working closely with a professor-mentor, students will begin the processes of reviewing literature and data collection for their capstone master’s projects. This course will meet based on scheduling needs between the professor-mentor and candidate.

Credits:
2

The structure of this course is similar to 684, with the addition of responsibilities to add at least two additional members to the candidate’s master’s committee.  Candidates work to complete their master’s thesis capstone project for submission to their committee by the deadline in the Summer 2 second term.