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Chinese

Credits:
2

Chinese 100 is a 2-credit course taught to students with no prior knowledge of Chinese during the Rhodes College Maymester program in a host institution in China. The course focuses on the four basic skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. It introduces students to Chinese language and culture. It involves language studies and cultural activities.

Credits:
4

This two-semester course introduces Chinese to students with no knowledge of the language. Equal emphasis will be given to acquiring
the rudiments of spoken and written Chinese. Students who complete the year-long course will master approximately 700 characters and
a vocabulary of a 1,000 words. It also intends to acquaint students with some aspects of Chinese culture and society as a necessary part
of their education in this language.

Credits:
4

This two-semester course introduces Chinese to students with no knowledge of the language. Equal emphasis will be given to acquiring
the rudiments of spoken and written Chinese. Students who complete the year-long course will master approximately 700 characters and
a vocabulary of a 1,000 words. It also intends to acquaint students with some aspects of Chinese culture and society as a necessary part
of their education in this language.

Credits:
2

Chinese 200 is a 2-credit course taught during the Rhodes College Maymester program in a host institution in China. The course focuses on the four skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Students enrolled in this should have completed Chinese 102 or have equivalent level of proficiency. It deepens students’ knowledge and understanding of Chinese language and culture. It involves language studies and cultural activities.

Credits:
4
Degree Requirements:
F10

In addition to the same objectives for the first year, this course aims at improving students’ aural-oral skills to achieve fluency and
comprehension, further developing their proficiency in reading for understanding, and enhancing their ability to write in Chinese and to
translate from Chinese into English and vice versa.

Credits:
4

In addition to the same objectives for the first year, this course aims at improving students’ aural-oral skills to achieve fluency and
comprehension, further developing their proficiency in reading for understanding, and enhancing their ability to write in Chinese and to
translate from Chinese into English and vice versa.

Credits:
4
Degree Requirements:
F4, F9

An introductory course of modern Chinese literature (1918-1989) designed to acquaint students with major phases of modern Chinese
literature and some masterpieces of representative writers in relation to political and social changes. The course provides opportunities to
learn about modern Chinese culture, society, and politics through readings of chosen works and trains students to read thoughtfully and
critically. The course is taught in English. Chinese 305 is reserved for majors, who will do substantial portions of the work for the course
in Chinese.

Credits:
4
Degree Requirements:
F4, F9

This course introduces East Asian cultures through the classic works of China, Japan, and Korea. In order to better grasp the cultural
legacies of East Asia, students will read various cultural texts such as fiction, poetry, drama, and prose in English translation. This course
is designed to help students develop a more sophisticated understanding of and critical appreciation for East Asian cultures. The course
is taught in English. Chinese 306 is reserved for majors, who will do substantial portions of the work for the course in Chinese.

Credits:
4
Degree Requirements:
F5, F9

This course explores both the evolving Chinese worldview represented in Chinese films and the western texts on China and the
Orient/East/Asia. While the course introduces the theoretical foundation of Chinese worldviews in response to Orientalism and
globalization, students will also survey the (mis-)representation of India and the Middle East in the western world for comparative
purposes. In addition to watching films and documentaries, students are required to read scholarly works, historical accounts, poems, and
travelogues in order to better understand diverse worldviews. By engaging the East-West dynamic, this course is designed for students
interested in the issues of cross-cultural understanding and global consciousness. The course is taught in English. Chinese 307 is
reserved for majors, who will do substantial portions of the work for the course in Chinese.

Credits:
4
Degree Requirements:
F4, F9

This course introduces one of the world’s richest literary heritages: traditional Chinese literature. It conducts a general survey of Chinese
literature from high antiquity up to modern times with the focus on some representative writers and their works. It consists of three major
sections: poetry and prose, drama, and fiction. All readings are in English. No prior knowledge of Chinese language and culture is
required.

Credits:
4
Degree Requirements:
F3, F9

This course introduces students to Chinese civilization and culture from the multiple perspectives of geography, history, philosophy,
language, literature, religion, art, people, society, and general ways of life. Major concerns will include, but are not restricted to, forms of
material and spiritual culture that have developed and changed through China’s continuous traditions; individual and collective values
that underlie social life, political organization, economics systems, family structure, human relationships, and individual behavior; and
the rationales that have made Chinese culture what it is. The course is taught in English. Chinese 314 is reserved for majors, who will do
substantial portions of the work for the course in Chinese.

Credits:
4
Degree Requirements:
F4, F9

This course looks into the changing constructions of gender, sexuality, and desire in Chinese literature and film over time. It seeks to
examine the social, cultural and institutional norms of gender behaviors in Chinese society as well as how the fictional imagination
conforms to, deviates from and subverts these norms. Other critical issues discussed include the complex relationships between identity
and performance, the construction of female subjectivity and male fantasy, gender and genre. Students will be encouraged to conduct
cross-genre and cross-cultural comparisons. All readings in English. Chinese 315 is reserved for majors, who will do substantial portions
of the work for the course in Chinese.

Credits:
4
Degree Requirements:
F9

Urbanization is one of the most prominent social-historical transformations that many Asian countries have experienced since the
beginning of the 20th century. Today, the huge wave of rural-urban internal migration in Asian countries represents one of the largest
population flows in the world. This course looks into ongoing urbanization as well as related demographic, economic and socio-cultural
changes occurring in a number of Asian cities and how the challenges associated with such transformations are portrayed in
contemporary cinema. The course looks into metropolises in Mainland China, Hong Kong, Taiwan, Japan, and Korea. In addition, it also
explores diasporic Asian spaces and the subsequent issues regarding race, immigration, identity and sense of place. It combines urban
studies with film studies. Taught in English. No prerequisites. This course also qualifies as an elective for Urban Studies, Asian Studies,
Film Studies, and Environmental Studies.

Credits:
4
Degree Requirements:
F5, F9

An introductory course on contemporary Chinese cinema that combines film viewing with readings of film theory and criticism. The aim
is to provide a window for students to glimpse the complexity of contemporary Chinese culture. Students will view selected Chinese
films produced in mainland China, Taiwan, and Hong Kong from the 1980’s to the present and be required to read essays of critical
studies which explore the interrelations of various issues in Chinese society. The course is taught in English. Chinese 320 is reserved for
majors, who will do substantial portions of the work for the course in Chinese.

Credits:
2

Chinese 300 is a 2-credit course taught during the Rhodes College Maymester program in a host institution in China. The course is designed to further develop proficiency in listening, speaking, reading and writing through studies of socio-cultural topics relevant to today's China. Students enrolled in this should have completed Chinese 202 or have equivalent level of proficiency. It involves language studies and cultural activities.

Credits:
4

This course lays greater emphasis on further developing students’ proficiency in reading for understanding and enhancing their ability to
write in Chinese and to translate from Chinese into English and vice versa. At the end of the year-long course students should be able to
read Chinese materials in everyday life, to write compositions in Chinese characters for daily communication, and to translate nontechnical
materials from Chinese into English and vice versa with the help of dictionaries.

Credits:
4

This course lays greater emphasis on further developing students’ proficiency in reading for understanding and enhancing their ability to
write in Chinese and to translate from Chinese into English and vice versa. At the end of the year-long course students should be able to
read Chinese materials in everyday life, to write compositions in Chinese characters for daily communication, and to translate nontechnical
materials from Chinese into English and vice versa with the help of dictionaries.

Credits:
4
Degree Requirements:
F4, F9

An introductory course of modern Chinese literature (1918-1989) designed to acquaint students with major phases of modern Chinese
literature and some masterpieces of representative writers in relation to political and social changes. The course provides opportunities to
learn about modern Chinese culture, society, and politics through readings of chosen works and trains students to read thoughtfully and
critically. The course is taught in English. Chinese 305 is reserved for majors, who will do substantial portions of the work for the course
in Chinese.

Credits:
4
Degree Requirements:
F4, F9

This course introduces East Asian cultures through the classic works of China, Japan, and Korea. In order to better grasp the cultural
legacies of East Asia, students will read various cultural texts such as fiction, poetry, drama, and prose in English translation. This course
is designed to help students develop a more sophisticated understanding of and critical appreciation for East Asian cultures. The course
is taught in English. Chinese 306 is reserved for majors, who will do substantial portions of the work for the course in Chinese.

Credits:
4
Degree Requirements:
F5, F9

This course explores both the evolving Chinese worldview represented in Chinese films and the western texts on China and the
Orient/East/Asia. While the course introduces the theoretical foundation of Chinese worldviews in response to Orientalism and
globalization, students will also survey the (mis-)representation of India and the Middle East in the western world for comparative
purposes. In addition to watching films and documentaries, students are required to read scholarly works, historical accounts, poems, and
travelogues in order to better understand diverse worldviews. By engaging the East-West dynamic, this course is designed for students
interested in the issues of cross-cultural understanding and global consciousness. The course is taught in English. Chinese 307 is
reserved for majors, who will do substantial portions of the work for the course in Chinese.

Credits:
1-4

Readings designed to meet individual interests and needs. May be taken more than once for credit with new topics.

Credits:
1

This reading course is reserved for Chinese majors and minors. It is designed to give students opportunities to read, write,
and speak in Chinese in conjunction with the coursework in English. May be taken more than once for credit with new topics.

Credits:
4
Degree Requirements:
F3, F9

This course introduces students to Chinese civilization and culture from the multiple perspectives of geography, history, philosophy, language, literature, religion, art, people, society, and general ways of life. Major concerns will include, but are not restricted to, forms of material and spiritual culture that have developed and changed through China’s continuous traditions; individual and collective values that underlie social life, political organization, economics systems, family structure, human relationships, and individual behavior; and the rationales that have made Chinese culture what it is. The course is taught in English. Chinese 314 is reserved for majors, who will do
substantial portions of the work for the course in Chinese.

Credits:
4
Degree Requirements:
F4, F9

This course looks into the changing constructions of gender, sexuality, and desire in Chinese literature and film over time. It seeks to
examine the social, cultural and institutional norms of gender behaviors in Chinese society as well as how the fictional imagination
conforms to, deviates from and subverts these norms. Other critical issues discussed include the complex relationships between identity
and performance, the construction of female subjectivity and male fantasy, gender and genre. Students will be encouraged to conduct
cross-genre and cross-cultural comparisons. All readings in English. Chinese 315 is reserved for majors, who will do substantial portions
of the work for the course in Chinese.

Credits:
4
Degree Requirements:
F5, F9

An introductory course on contemporary Chinese cinema that combines film viewing with readings of film theory and criticism. The aim
is to provide a window for students to glimpse the complexity of contemporary Chinese culture. Students will view selected Chinese
films produced in mainland China, Taiwan, and Hong Kong from the 1980’s to the present and be required to read essays of critical
studies which explore the interrelations of various issues in Chinese society. The course is taught in English. Chinese 320 is reserved for
majors, who will do substantial portions of the work for the course in Chinese.

Credits:
4

Intensive study of some aspect or theme of Chinese literature, culture or society in China. May be taken more than once for credit with new topics.

Credits:
2 or 4

This 4-credit course leads students to discuss a broad range of topics about contemporary China and to conduct a senior project of Chinese Studies. Students will participate in class discussions on assigned readings and provide weekly progress reports of their senior research projects. Under special circumstances, students may be allowed to take the senior seminar for 2 credits only. Under its project-driven design, the 2-credit seminar gives each major student the opportunity to conduct a senior project of Chinese Studies. Both the 2-credit and 4-credit courses conclude with the completion of the senior essay and a formal academic presentation given by each major student.