HUM 101 The Search for Values in the Light of Western History and Religion

The Search for Values in the Light of Western History and Religion is an interdisciplinary study of the ideas, beliefs, and cultural developments that have formed Western culture. The first two courses of the sequence are taken in the fall (Humanities 101) and spring (Humanities 102) semesters of the first year. In these courses, students examine original documents in translation from the history and literature of the Israelites, the Greeks, the Romans, and the early Christians.

RELS 101 The Bible: Texts and contexts

The first in a two-course sequence of selected topics that enables students to develop critical knowledge of biblical texts and post-biblical traditions by helping them understand how these works and their histories of reception inform interpretive contexts. Students will acquire skills in critical thinking, analysis, reading, and writing that will equip them to recognize the relevance of the academic study of biblical texts and religion.

HUM 102 The Search for Values in the Light of Western History and Religion

The Search for Values in the Light of Western History and Religion is an interdisciplinary study of the ideas, beliefs, and cultural developments that have formed Western culture. The first two courses of the sequence are taken in the fall (Humanities 101) and spring (Humanities 102) semesters of the first year. In these courses, students examine original documents in translation from the history and literature of the Israelites, the Greeks, the Romans, and the early Christians.

RELS 102 The Bible: Texts and contexts

This is the second of a two-course sequence of selected topics enables students to develop critical knowledge of biblical texts and post-biblical traditions by helping them understand how these works and their histories of reception inform interpretive contexts. Students will acquire skills in critical thinking, analysis, reading, and writing that will equip them to recognize the relevance of the academic study of biblical texts and religion.

AMS 110 Pathways to Cultural Knowledge I

As societies inherit and then redefine their own cultural realities, they also accumulate selective knowledge that is important in shaping their religious, political, and philosophical identities. But how is this cultural knowledge transmitted usefully and memorably to others? While reading an eclectic range of texts including biblical works, heroic epics, philosophical treatises, modern performance poetry, and more, we will explore varied communication strategies in oral storytelling, written manuscripts and papyri, printed texts, and even sign language and the internet.

AMS 111 Pathways to Cultural Knowledge II

As societies inherit and then redefine their own cultural realities, they also accumulate selective knowledge that is important in shaping their religious, political, and philosophical identities. But how is this cultural knowledge transmitted usefully and memorably to others? While reading an eclectic range of texts including biblical works, heroic epics, philosophical treatises, modern performance poetry, and more, we will explore varied communication strategies in oral storytelling, written manuscripts and papyri, printed texts, and even sign language and the internet.

PHIL 201 Ancient Philosophy

This course examines pre-Socratic, Platonic, Aristotelian, and Hellenistic contributions to Western philosophy, with some emphasis on philosophy of science and ethics. We examine a broad range of philosophical topics including: nature, knowledge, virtue, and happiness. There will be a strong emphasis on analyzing the arguments found in the texts. Offered yearly.

HUM 201 The Search for Values in the Light of Western History and Religion

The Search for Values in the Light of Western History and Religion is an interdisciplinary study of the ideas, beliefs, and cultural developments that have formed Western culture. The first two courses of the sequence are taken in the fall (Humanities 101) and spring (Humanities 102) semesters of the first year. In these courses, students examine original documents in translation from the history and literature of the Israelites, the Greeks, the Romans, and the early Christians.

PHIL 203 Early Modern Philosophy

An examination of major representatives of Early Modern Philosophy, focusing on the works of Descartes, Hume, and Kant. Issues to be considered include such things as the nature and role of rationality, the relation of the sensuous and the rational, the exercise of freedom, and the existence of God. Offered yearly.

GREK 203 Koine Greek

This course introduces students to koine Greek, the “common” dialect of the post-classical period from ca. 323 BCE to AD 300 and
concentrates on the narrative and epistolary texts of the New Testament. Instructors may choose to read in addition some selections from
the Greek translation of the Hebrew Scriptures (Septuagint), the Apocrypha and Pseudepigrapha, Philo, and Josephus. Its primary aims
are to help students improve not only their ability to read ancient Greek texts in the original but also to critically examine them, building