PHYS 111 Introductory Physics for the Physical Sciences I

Suitable for both science and non-science majors, this calculus-based course is the first in a year-long sequence covering the classical fields of physics. Topics include Newtonian mechanics, including rotational motion, and wave motion. Must be taken concurrently with Physics 113. MATH 112/113 should be taken concurrently if no course in differential calculus has been completed in high school or elsewhere.

ENVS 111 Physical Geology

Introduction to the composition and structure of the earth and processes that create modern landscapes. Topics include plate tectonics, the
formation of minerals and rocks, weathering, erosion, and crustal deformation. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week,
plus optional week-end field trips.

PHYS 112 Introductory Physics for Physical Sciences II

Suitable for both science and non-science majors, this calculus-based course is the second in a year-long sequence covering the classical fields of physics. Topics include thermodynamics, electromagnetism, and optical properties of matter. Must be taken concurrently with Physics 114L. Physics majors and minors should take Mathematics 122 or equivalent concurrently.

PHYS 113 Introductory Physics Laboratory I

Basic experiments in topics covered in the Introductory Physics courses. Includes extensive use of computer-based data collection and analysis. Must be taken concurrently with Physics 109 or 111.

 

PHYS 114 Introductory Physics Laboratory II

Basic experiments in topics covered in the Introductory Physics courses. Includes extensive use of computer-based data collection and analysis. Must be taken concurrently with Physics 110 or 112.

 

 

ART 120 Chemistry and Art

This is an interdisciplinary course investigating science and art through the analysis of related themes and experiences. The course will not privilege one method of inquiry over another, nor does it seek to compare or contrast them. Rather, it is the explicit goal to see artistic and scientific inquiry as related expressions of the human mind. The instructors presuppose no more than a general awareness of art history or applied science but we expect a commitment to investigate aspects of both disciplines with equal enthusiasm.

ARCE 120 Field Research in Environmental Archaeology

This course and accompanying lab focus on a scientific understanding of the biological and geological methods and theories that are
relevant to human/environmental interaction in pre-historic and historic sites of human occupation. Research questions to be discussed
involve three major areas of study: 1) relationships between site formation processes, environmental change and human activity; 2) plant
and animal domestication and exploitation; and 3) methods for dating artifacts. The class and lab are held in May and early June at the

ENVS 120 Introduction to Earth and Atmospheric Science

This course provides an introduction to the Earth’s physical landscape including climate, landforms, and vegetation, and the processes
that link them. The first section of the course examines atmospheric processes and the distribution and characteristics of the Earth’s
climatic regions. The second section of the course focuses on processes at or near the Earth’s surface and gives special attention to
volcanic and tectonic landforms; weathering and erosion; fluvial, aeolian and glacial processes; and the landforms they produce. The

CHEM 120 Foundations of Chemistry

A study of the basic concepts and principles of chemistry. Topics to be considered include stoichiometry, acids and bases, atomic and molecular structure, bonding, kinetics and thermodynamics. F7 awarded only with satisfactory completion of CHEM 120 and CHEM 125.

BIOL 120 Introduction to Environmental Sciences

This course focuses on a scientific understanding of the environment as well as on people’s impact upon the natural world. Emphasis is on critical evaluation of environmental issues based on scientific principles. The fundamental ecological principles are the foundations for the students’ learning and understanding of, among others, human population dynamics, natural resources, energy sources and their use, and sustainable human systems. Through field-based laboratories, the students learn how to evaluate and quantify the ecosystem services provided by an urban park like Overton Park.