ECON 100 Introduction to Economics

A survey of economic analysis and institutions combining economic theory with a discussion of applications to the U. S. economic system for majors and non-majors. The course will include an introduction to both microeconomics and macroeconomics. Microeconomics: Study of the behavior of consumers and firms in competitive and noncompetitive markets, and the consequences of this behavior for resource allocation and income distribution. Consideration of government’s role in competitive and noncompetitive markets.

PSYC 105 Special Topics in Psychology

This course is designed for the non-psychology major and will examine a different general-interest topic each time it is taught. Students will be exposed to the five major theoretical perspectives and to research methods as they pertain to a thematic topic such as ‘close relationships,’ ‘psychology of the self,’ ‘drugs, brain, and behavior,’ etc.

POLS 110 Political Questions

What is just? What is right? Are human beings equal? In what ways should we be free? To what degree must we obey the state? What are our duties to others? Is “big government” compatible with individual liberty? This course explores these and other fundamental political questions concerning freedom and authority, rights and obligations, peace and war, moral obligation and selfishness, faith and reason. It will also delve into contentious public policy problems (e.g., income inequality, affirmative action, sexual discrimination), each of which poses moral and practical difficulties.

INTS 110 Introduction to International Relations

A survey of contemporary international politics. Major topics covered in this course include international political geography, the
evolution of the international system, the nation-state, modern diplomacy, international political economy, international law and
organization, the East-West conflict, and North-South issues.

INTS 120 Introduction to Comparative Politics

An introduction to the principal theories, analytical approaches, and methods relating to the study of comparative politics. Concrete country and case studies are used to highlight the relationship between the tools of comparative politics and real world political events and processes.

MUSC 145 Psychology of Music

This course is an introduction to the multidisciplinary study of music in the human experience. There will be a review and critical analysis of traditional and emerging issues in this rapidly evolving field. In addition to developing a musical vocabulary and critical listening skills, the course will address the questions of what is music and how the mind responds to musical stimuli through the confluence of various disciplines, including anthropology, biology, education, musicology, neuroscience, philosophy, physics, psychology, and sociology.

PSYC 150 Introduction to Psychological Science

This course will cover major content domains in the discipline of Psychology, including biological, cognitive, developmental, social and personality, and mental health. In addition, themes that are relevant to all of these domains and that link content areas will be discussed, with emphasis on ethics and cultural/social diversity. This course is also intended to foster an appreciation of the role of scientific reasoning in understanding human behavior and the mind.

POLS 151 United States Politics

What is the foundation of government in the United States? What are its purposes? How is the constitution of government designed to achieve those purposes? How well does it in fact fulfill those purposes? Major topics and controversies include the nature of politics, individual liberty and constitutionalism, the federal structure of government, elections and political parties, interest groups, representation, Congress, the Presidency, the Judiciary, civil rights and liberties.

URBN 201 Introduction to Urban Studies

An interdisciplinary approach to examining issues and institutions in American cities; neighborhoods, downtowns, suburbs, housing,poverty, environmental justice, nonprofits and city politics; discussion of urban public and social policies; field trips or service learningwill be used to do hands on analysis of urban issues.

EDUC 201 Foundations of Education

Foundations of Education serves as an introduction to the social, cultural, and philosophical foundations of education in the United States. It is designed to cover elements of the history, anthropology, philosophy, sociology, and theory of educational practice in this country, and with the enduring questions, debates, and conflicts that abound regarding teaching, learning, schools, and society.